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ACRI

2017 President Kevin Duncombe

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Kevin Duncombe Named 2017 President of Leading Trade Association

Western Pacific Pulp & Paper’s President to Lead Statewide Recycling Association

San Gabriel, Calif., March 22, 2017 – The Association of California Recycling Industries (ACRI) has selected Kevin Duncombe from Western Pacific Pulp & Paper, based in Downey, as its 2017 President. Mr. Duncombe recently served as Vice President and will succeed Adam Holt from Allan Company in leading the statewide association.


“I have been active in ACRI since 1990 and for the past several years I’ve had the pleasure of serving on the Board of Directors and working with recyclers throughout the state,” stated Kevin Duncombe, ACRI President.  “I am looking forward to working with our membership to protect the rights of independent recyclers and promote the development of responsible recycling policy statewide.”


Kevin Duncombe began his career in the recovered fiber industry after receiving his Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Michigan and Master of Business Administration from Western Michigan University. Mr. Duncombe moved to Los Angeles in 1990 to join Western Pacific in the export department, quickly becoming Vice President and General Manager in 1993 and President of the company in 1998.


“ACRI is committed to protecting the environment and promoting free market principles and ethical practices,” stated Duncombe.  “On behalf of the thousands of men and women employed by our industry, and who daily divert large quantities of paper, plastic and metal commodities from California’s landfills, I will ensure our voices and priorities continue to be heard in Sacramento and throughout our state.”


Duncombe, who resides in Orange County, was recently installed as ACRI President, along with the 2017 Board of Directors, at the association’s Annual Meeting held in Southern California.


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About the Association of California Recycling Industries: The Association of California Recycling Industries (ACRI) is a nonprofit trade association representing the interests of independent recyclers throughout California.  For more information about the Association of California Recycling Industries please visit: www.acrinow.org.

California’s Recycling Program Is So Successful It’s Going Broke

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6/2/2016

By Craig Boudreau on The Daily Caller

http://dailycaller.com/2016/06/23/californias-recycling-program-is-so-successful-its-going-broke/

California’s recycling program has been so popular it’s failing, as hundreds of recycling centers have been forced to close.

Hundreds of recycling centers have been forced to close due to falling aluminum prices on the commodities market as well as the popularity of California’s recycling program, reports The Sacramento Bee. The state’s recycling regulatory system and a collapse in global commodity prices are also making recycling uneconomical, according to experts familiar with such programs.

“California’s recycling system has been undermined by its own popularity.” Alexei Koseff of The Sacramento Bee wrote Thursday.

The way California incentivizes recycling is problematic, according to Teresa Bui of Californians Against Waste. She told TheDCNF the fact that 80 percent of Californians recycle is actually hurting the state’s effort to cut down on waste.

Citing falling aluminum commodity prices and lower reimbursement rates, California’s largest recycler, rePlanet, has closed 191 recycling centers and laid off 278 employees.

What isn’t recycled generally goes to funding government initiatives, like the recycling program. When more people recycle, less money is available for these programs and the less money recycling centers get for their business. So, California’s recycling program has been too successful in that sense.
“It is global market prices – over which the state nor the recycling industry have any real control – that is the most significant factor in the challenges facing the recycling industry here and elsewhere,” Mark Oldfield of CalRecycle told The Daily Caller News Foundation.


What isn’t recycled generally goes to funding government initiatives, like the recycling program. When more people recycle, less money is available for these programs and the less money recycling centers get for their business. So, California’s recycling program has been too successful in that sense.

“It is global market prices – over which the state nor the recycling industry have any real control – that is the most significant factor in the challenges facing the recycling industry here and elsewhere,” Mark Oldfield of CalRecycle told The Daily Caller News Foundation.


A list put together by WalletHub ranked the top recycling states, California finished in a tie for third with Arkansas.

There is also an issue of fraud, where cans and bottles from out-of-state find their way in and CA is forced to pay out money they never received in the first place from point of sale. Out-of-state cans and bottles are not accepted in CA recycling centers unless the shipper notifies and gets clearance from the state.

“In the past few years, working with the CA Department of Justice and others, anti-fraud efforts have ramped up and there have been numerous arrests.” Oldfield said. While Oldfield does agree fraud is an issue, he also says that it is a “separate issue from the market forces that led to the rePlanet closures.”

The L.A. Times ran a piece in 2012 in which semi-trailers full of recyclables have been making their way into California via Arizona and Nevada.

“The illicit trade is draining the state’s $1.1-billion recycling fund. Government officials recently estimated the fraud at $40 million a year, and an industry expert said it could exceed $200 million.” according to Jessica Garrison’s L.A. Times article.

CalRecycle published a piece in April about a commercial truck having been caught trying to ship an entire trailer of out-of-state recyclables from Nevada, noting that this was the second time in a matter of months this particular company tried to do such. The truck was carrying $15,464 of recyclable materials.

California’s recycling program has been so popular it’s failing, as hundreds of recycling centers have been forced to close.

Hundreds of recycling centers have been forced to close due to falling aluminum prices on the commodities market as well as the popularity of California’s recycling program, reports The Sacramento Bee. The state’s recycling regulatory system and a collapse in global commodity prices are also making recycling uneconomical, according to experts familiar with such programs.

“California’s recycling system has been undermined by its own popularity.” Alexei Koseff of The Sacramento Bee wrote Thursday.

The way California incentivizes recycling is problematic, according to Teresa Bui of Californians Against Waste. She told TheDCNF the fact that 80 percent of Californians recycle is actually hurting the state’s effort to cut down on waste.

Citing falling aluminum commodity prices and lower reimbursement rates, California’s largest recycler, rePlanet, has closed 191 recycling centers and laid off 278 employees.

A list put together by WalletHub ranked the top recycling states, California finished in a tie for third with Arkansas.

There is also an issue of fraud, where cans and bottles from out-of-state find their way in and CA is forced to pay out money they never received in the first place from point of sale. Out-of-state cans and bottles are not accepted in CA recycling centers unless the shipper notifies and gets clearance from the state.

“In the past few years, working with the CA Department of Justice and others, anti-fraud efforts have ramped up and there have been numerous arrests.” Oldfield said. While Oldfield does agree fraud is an issue, he also says that it is a “separate issue from the market forces that led to the rePlanet closures.”

The L.A. Times ran a piece in 2012 in which semi-trailers full of recyclables have been making their way into California via Arizona and Nevada.

“The illicit trade is draining the state’s $1.1-billion recycling fund. Government officials recently estimated the fraud at $40 million a year, and an industry expert said it could exceed $200 million.” according to Jessica Garrison’s L.A. Times article.

CalRecycle published a piece in April about a commercial truck having been caught trying to ship an entire trailer of out-of-state recyclables from Nevada, noting that this was the second time in a matter of months this particular company tried to do such. The truck was carrying $15,464 of recyclable materials.

Newly expanded Panama Canal opens for bigger business

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http://www.bworldonline.com/content.php?section=&title=newly-expanded-panama-canal-opens-for-bigger-business&id=129504


Posted on June 27, 2016


PANAMA is preparing to officially open its canal this weekend to far bigger cargo ships after nearly a decade of expansion work aimed at boosting transit revenues and global trade.

Centennial Bridge at the Panama Canal -- Panama Canal Authority
On Sunday, a VIP ceremony will be held on the banks of the canal to inaugurate the completion of the works.

President Juan Carlos Varela will unveil the new locks and third shipping lane built into the 102-year-old canal. Foreign dignitaries, including the presidents of Taiwan, Chile and other Central American nations, will be present at the ceremony.

A Chinese-owned Neopanamax-class cargo ship will be the first vessel to officially test the new infrastructure, entering from the Atlantic and exiting into the Pacific a few hours later.

The Neopanamax vessels are much bigger than the Panamax-class ships that previously were the largest able to pass through the 80-kilometer (50-mile) long canal. Each is able to haul three times as much cargo as the smaller predecessors.

The expansion work began in 2007 and was meant to have been completed in 2014, but it ran well past deadline, and over budget.

The expansion is estimated to have cost $5.5 billion. However, outstanding disputes between the Spanish- and Italian-led consortium that carried out the work and the Panamanian government could yet hike that figure by hundreds of millions more.

PRIDE, AND OPPORTUNITY
For Panama, the unveiling of the broader canal is a moment of pride and of opportunity.

Now, ships as long as the Eiffel Tower is tall, and as broad as Olympic-sized swimming pools, will be able to use the canal.

Annual cargo volumes should double over the next decade, leading Panama to hope to triple the $1 billion in shipping fees it receives each year.

Also, with the country these days linked to the “Panama Papers” scandal of offshore businesses owned by the world’s wealthy and influential, the expanded canal is seen as a chance to burnish the country’s tarnished image.

This will show the “real face of Panama,” Panama Canal Authority (ACP) chief Jorge Quijano told AFP in an interview this week.

World trade should also benefit from what will essentially be an inter-oceanic highway for goods between the United States and Asia. More cargo on bigger ships should mean lower transport costs.

US GAS SHIPMENTS
Panama is also avidly eyeing the lucrative market of transporting liquefied natural gas between the United States and Asia, principally to Japan.

The ships carrying the gas were too big to use the old canal. With the expansion, they now can.

“When we started this expansion, we did not have on our radar that the United States was going to be a net exporter of gas and oil,” ACP deputy administrator Manuel Benitez Hawkins told journalists Saturday.

Now, with the US producing gas and oil from shale, American interest in using the canal has grown.

“That will add to the revenue and help us recoup” the massive investment, Benitez said.

Currently, some five percent of global maritime commercial traffic uses the canal, which provides a valuable shortcut between North America and Asia. -- AFP

Raids on Storage Yards Uncover Recycling Fraud Rings: Two plead guilty in Los Angeles County smuggling schemes

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Thank you and congratulations toCalRecycle for your fraud prevention efforts across the state!


SACRAMENTO--Two men from the Los Angeles area will spend time behind bars and pay $1.02 million in restitution to the California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle) for operating multi-state recycling fraud rings from two public storage facilities in South Gate. A five-month investigation revealed the men used the storage facilities as hubs to smuggle out-of-state used beverage containers into California for the purpose of defrauding the California Redemption Value Fund.

“Californians expect and deserve vigorous fraud-prevention efforts to ensure the nickel or dime they pay at the cash register for CRV doesn’t wind up in the hands of criminal organizations,” CalRecycle Director Scott Smithline said. “CalRecycle and its enforcement partners won’t stop until we put these smugglers out of business for good.”

Plastic Bags full with beverage containers in storage facilites.
California Department of Justice

photos of evidence from

May 4, 2016, raid at South Gate

storage facilities

Storage facilities filled with plastic bags.
Bags full with beverage containers.
Piles of bags on pavement in front of storage lockers.

Acting on a tip from CalRecycle, the California Department of Justice’s Recycling Fraud Team launched an investigation into Nova Storage and South Gate Public Self Storage in December 2015. During the investigation, agents observed used beverage containers from Phoenix, Ariz., being illegally transported to the South Gate storage facilities, then taken to local recycling centers and fraudulently redeemed for California Redemption Value.

On May 4, 2016, agents, with the assistance of CalRecycle staff, executed search warrants at the locations listed below and made the following discoveries:

Nova Storage - 5951 Firestone Blvd., South Gate

  • Agents witnessed four people unloading used beverage containers from a J&A Trucking trailer; four people, including the truck driver, were detained.
  • The truck driver told agents he had picked up the material in Albuquerque, N.M., on May 3, 2016.
  • Agents arrested Francisco Flores, 59, of Los Angeles after determining he was the head of the organization and had hired the others to work for him.

South Gate Public Self Storage - 5911 Firestone Boulevard, South Gate

  • Agents witnessed seven people unloading used beverage containers from a Bustillos Express trailer; eight people, including the truck driver, were detained.
  • The truck driver told agents he had picked up the material in Phoenix, Ariz., on May 3, 2016.
  • Agents determined four of the people were being paid by Francisco Flores to unload the materials and deliver them to local recycling centers.
  • Agents arrested Guillermo Chavez, 62, of Anaheim after determining he was the leader of a second smuggling ring who hired others to unload and redeem out-of-state material.

Agents searched a total of 18 storage units at the two locations and seized 35,479 pounds of aluminum used beverage containers worth an estimated $70,958 in potential CRV. They also seized 9,125 pounds of plastic used beverage containers worth an estimated $11,406 in potential CRV.

At a hearing on May 11, 2016, Flores pleaded guilty to charges of felony recycling fraud and was sentenced to one year in jail and ordered to pay $800,000 in restitution. Chavez pleaded guilty to grand theft and was sentenced to four months in jail and $225,000 in restitution.

At a Glance: CalRecycle’s Fraud Prevention Efforts

California’s Beverage Container Recycling and Litter Reduction Act incentivizes recycling through a CRV fee paid by California consumers at the time of purchase and refunded upon return of the empty beverage containers to recycling centers certified by CalRecycle to refund CRV. Since the fee is not paid on beverages purchased outside the state, those containers are not eligible for CRV redemption.

In addition to CalRecycle’s interagency agreements with CDOJ and CDFA, CalRecycle aggressively combats fraud and illicit payments through enhanced precertification training of recycling center owners; probationary reviews of recycling centers; oversight of certified processors; monitoring and tracking of imported materials; risk assessment of daily claims for reimbursement; application of prepayment controls; and post-payment reviews and investigations.

ACRI Opinion - Inland Valley Daily Bulletin

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Limit on recycling in Pomona would be harmful: Guest commentary

POSTED: 04/15/16, 1:42 PM PDT

By Adam Holt

California residents have a proud history of working to protect our environment. When it comes to protecting our community, we are leaders in working together to improve local air quality or reduce the number of unsightly landfills.

Each year, Californians recycle more than 18 million of the 21 million beverage containers purchased. Those containers are diverted from local landfills. According to CalRecycle, the state agency that oversees recycling, many of these containers can take up to 700 years to break down once placed in a landfill.

Recently several residents in Pomona have been urging the city to consider placing a limit on recycling activities. We believe their request is shortsighted and needs to be carefully reviewed by city leaders. Such a policy would dramatically reduce the amount of beverage containers and other recyclable materials that are diverted from local landfills.

In addition to the environmental benefits associated with recycling, the recycling industry employs more than 57,000 men and women in California.

California cities, including Pomona, have been given a goal by the state Legislature to divert 75 percent of their waste from local landfills by the year 2020. If the city were to placing artificial limits on the amount of recycling in Pomona, it would be limiting the community’s ability to meet its recycling and waste diversion goals, and forcing more waste materials into local landfills.

As the leading association of professional recyclers, we look forward to working with the city of Pomona and others to ensure that residents and businesses can continue to maximize the amount of materials they recycle and divert from local landfills.

Through good planning and open communication, we believe Pomona can continue to protect the environment, and thereby enhance the quality of life for residents through responsible recycling

Adam Holt is president of the Association of California Recycling Industries; http://acrinow.org.

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